vividoffice

22
Jan

6 Useless Eye Facts That Will Make You More Interesting at Dinner Parties

1.Male and female brains process colours slightly differently. When it comes to colour, men and women don’t seem to see eye to eye. If you and your partner have ever bumped heads when choosing the perfect paint colour, you wouldn’t be the first. It Is believed that this has to do with the difference levels of testosterone in men and

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16
Jan

What is a cataract?

A cataract is clouding of the lens in your eye which goes on to effect your vision. To understand how a cataract can effect your vision, it help to know a little bit about the structure of the eye:   The lens is clear and lies behind the iris and the pupil and works much like a camera lens. The

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10
Jan

The role of an Optometry Society in career pathways for students

Written by Luke McRoy-Jones, President of Plymouth Optometry Society. Plymouth OpSoc is the exclusive society for optometry students studying at the University of Plymouth. As a society, we represent around 200 undergraduate students across three years of the programme, as well as postgraduates and alumni. The role of the society ultimately is to enhance the university experience for our students.

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2
Jan

Life as an Optical Advisor in Domiciliary

Having spent a decade in the optics sector I have managed to experience the working culture in both retail and domiciliary. Working as an OA in domiciliary is more than just dispensing spectacles! There are so many aspects to it: Managing your own clinic When out on field you are basically the clinic manager whereby you need to ensure that

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12
Dec

Laser Eye Surgery

Laser eye surgery is the most common elective treatment in the world, and in the UK more people undergo surgery with Optical Express than all of our competitors combined. What does it involve? Laser eye surgery is a safe, effective and quick procedure. There are two types of treatment: LASIK and LASEK. The former uses a sophisticated femtosecond laser to

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28
Nov

Diabetes on the eyes

Diabetic retinopathy is diabetes-related damage to blood vessels that nourish the light-sensitive retina of the eye. This damage can occur from either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and the longer you have the disease, the greater your risk of vision problems. As the condition progresses the retina becomes swollen and blood vessels begin to leak fluid and blood into

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21
Nov

Carrots, Science and WWII

I’ve grown up with the saying that “carrots help you see in the dark” – but is this true? There is intriguing science behind the question, but it may not be exactly for the reasons you may think! But before we get into all of that, there is another question that needs answering, what came first… the theory or the

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31
Oct

How do 3D glasses work and what’s the history?

Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) a British scientist applied principles of stereopsis, the ability to perceive depth, to create the first 3D viewing device: the stereoscope. Sir David Brewster (1781-1868) a Scottish scientist later streamlined it and what resulted was the world’s first portable, 3D viewing device – the lenticular stereoscope! Like a pair of binoculars, these could be easily wielded by viewers

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24
Oct

Dry Eye Digest – Read All About It!

Dry eye syndrome is a condition where the eyes do not make enough tears, or the tears evaporate too quickly. This can lead to the eyes drying out and becoming inflamed. It is a common condition and becomes more common with age, especially in women. Up to a third of people age 65 or older may have dry eye syndrome.

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17
Oct

Glaucoma and how to (try!) prevent it!

A very common eye condition that can affect people of all ages, Glaucoma is mostly apparent in people in the latter part of life (65+). Glaucoma is where the optic nerve, which connects the eye to the brain, becomes damaged, predominantly by the build-up in fluid at the front part of the eye which increases pressure, resulting in loss of

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